Acronyms.  They are everywhere in life.  It is no small wonder that the American English language is dying.  No one actually speaks fully anymore.  Now, I don’t claim to be an expert in either the English language or speech, however, I am seeing first hand the language is dying.

 Various industries have their own “lingo” and many also use acronyms.  The first organization that comes to mind is the United   States military. My late father was a U.S. Marine and his period of service started in the 1940’s I learned their acronyms and “lingo” from an early age.  I also had a parent who is originally from Canada, so let’s add in a few more equivalent terms.  I was in kindergarten when I finally realized that a bathroom was not just the “loo” or “latrine” or “head.”  My absolute favorite acronym is “Snafu.”  I think that this one has become common in the civilian world as well.  Interestingly, this word came into usage in the early 1940’s.  The online dictionary that I like to use has a good definition for it.  I like online dictionaries, since they usually have even the most recently accepted words defined.

 Another industry that uses a large number of acronyms and has a confusing lingo is the education business.  To be a teacher in California, one must pass first the CBEST.  A potential teacher also must take the CSET and there is a huge push to obtain a BCLAD credential.  Are you lost yet?  You are not alone.  If your child needs special education services, there is a subset of “eduspeak” that the school hopes a parent will never actually master, in case the school goofs up at your child’s IEP meeting; e.g.  Johnny is not decoding sufficient vocabulary in the grade level per state standards.  Well, I know what that means, but I had to school myself in this lingo to be a parent of a special needs child.

 I like words.  I have a lot to say and this is the best way I know how to convey it.  Spoken or written fully or in code, this is what separates us from the other creatures on the planet.

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